This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
 

Monthly Archives: June 2018

Tricks to Swim Faster

If you have been swimming training for weeks on end, you will be in relatively good condition and more than ready to try something new. Swimming can be very boring if you let it, but it can also be a lot of fun too. If you have mastered the endurance part of swimming, it is about time for you to start focusing on improving your speed and smash that PB.

Long distance swimmers training for Triathlons or the Half Ironman, listen up because this article applies to you. You’ll be adding some “Fartlek” training to your training repertoire to increase your pace a little whilst also improving the speed at which you recover.

Fartlek is Swiss for “Speed Play”, it sounds fun and it is. Fartlek trains the body to switch gears and recruit different muscle fibres; it is often used by long distance runners to improve running speed, but can just effectively be used by swimmers to improve their times too.

During your laps you will be working at Pace 1 and Pace 2. Pace 1 is a steady long distance maintainable speed, Pace 2 is 50-70{3ef47828a7c259db772c7dd40d461a2fc3c07983a36e986141d323980a5355fc} maximum sprint speed, depending on your fitness level. As you get better these two speeds will gradually speed up. There’s four stages to the Fartlek, depending on fitness levels and your commitment, it may take a week or a month to advance through each of the stages.

Stage 1: Start your regular swim session with your usual warm up. The Fartlek session will be 10 laps. Swim half the length of the pool at Pace 1, then sprint the rest of the length of the pool at Pace 2. There’s no stopping when you finish the lap, just tumble-turn and slow down during Pace 1. Pace 1 is recovery, Pace 2 is at speed. You may need to adjust your pace so you can finish the entire 10 laps. At this stage burn-out halfway through the session is not the goal.

Incorporate Fartlek into your training at least three times a week on alternate days.

Stage 2: When you are ready, move onto doing 10 laps Fartlek training alternating each lap at Pace 1 followed by a lap at Pace 2. Remember, no stopping at the end of each lap.

Stage 3: Now you should be ready to alternate Pace 1 and Pace 2 for 10 laps, but with Pace 2 at maximum speed. It should burn and you should be breathless during recovery at Pace 1. If you’re not feeling it, push harder.

Stage 4: Really ramp things up by changing the recovery verses speed ratio. Aim for 12 laps, but we now swim one lap at Pace 1 followed immediately by two laps at Pace 2.

Stay Safe When Surfing

Dangerous surfing situations can happen fast and without warning. Follow these tips to do your part to stay safe out in the water.

Know how to swim. You must be a strong swimmer to surf. Treading water won’t be good enough if you’re tossed from your board or pulled out by a rip.

Wear safety gear. Use a leash. You’ll avoid losing your board or having it hit others in the head, and it can help you find your way back to the surface if you get disoriented underwater. Rash guards, wetsuits, and booties will protect your body from cold waters, reefs, and the sun.

Watch out for rips. Rip currents can be exhausting at best, deadly at worst. Avoid them at all costs. Watch for “rivers” in the water, areas of faster or backward flowing current. The waves will look flatter or uneven in this area. If you do get caught, motion for help or start paddling parallel to the shore until you break free.

Practice sun safety. Wear sunscreen and sunglasses or a UV-blocking wetsuit top. More surfers die from skin cancer than drownings.

Don’t dive head first. Never dive head first into unknown waters. Neck injuries can be life-long and debilitating. If you’re taking a fall, extend a hand out in front of you and fall flat. This is especially important in surf breaks over reefs or in shallow areas.

Protect your head. Make sure you know where your board is at all times. A leash helps with this. Protect your head as you surface to avoid getting hit by your board.

Surf with a friend. Use the buddy system every time you hit the water. If you get in to trouble, you’ll have someone to help you.

Know your limits. Don’t attempt to tackle waves beyond your abilities and don’t rely on your leash to protect you. Leashes can break in big surf, which means you’ll be out there without your board in conditions you may not be able to handle.

Know And Practice Surf Etiquette

Surfing is a fun and laid-back sport full of camaraderie. A lot of this philosophy can be attributed to practicing good surf etiquette.

Watch out for other surfers. Hang on to your board so it doesn’t hit other surfers. Never ditch it if you can help it.

Wear a leash. Related to #1 above, a leash helps keep your board with you. You won’t have to swim after if it you lose it and you won’t have to worry about it hitting someone else.

Don’t paddle in front of others. Also called “snaking”, this involves paddling around someone to get ahead of him or her and closer to the wave in an attempt to gain right of way.

Practice right of way. The surfer closest to the curl has right of way. Don’t drop in on them. Wait for the next wave. Paddling surfers yield to surfers riding a swell.

Right Football Cleats

If you are a quarterback player, you should opt for mid-cut football cleats as they will make it easier for you to move around on the field.

For skill players, low-cut football cleats are also recommended but they don’t provide as much support to the ankles. Low-cuts are lightweight but allow more flexibility so you can play well.

If you don’t play on different types of fields, molded cleats is your best bet. Usually, this type of cleats features rubber that is connected to the bottom. It offers more traction as you play on the ground.

On the other hand, if you keep on changing the type of fields you play on, we recommend that you buy shoes with cleats that are detachable. This will offer more versatility.

You can customize detachable cleats replacing them with a different size. For this, you can use a cleat wrench.

For wet or grassy fields, you can get shoes with 12 studs and long cleats. These cleats offer the best traction.

For muddy fields, cleats with a length of 2.54 cm are an ideal choice. These cleats will save you from sliding on wet fields.

For natural grass fields, you can use 1.27 cm cleats for more traction. The bottom of these shoes has little nubs that offer better traction for you to play on artificial grass.

Leather football shoes are all the rage these days due to a number of reasons. Leather shoes offer better flexibility helping your feet to breathe easily. However, you should keep in mind that leather shoes are not designed for wet fields. Playing on wet fields with leather shoes on will cause problems for you, as leather tends to absorb water.

You can use conditioner made of mink oil for maintaining your leather shoes. This conditioner will protect your shoes from water.

Serving In Matches

1) Set your own tempo and rhythm.

You need to always serve at your own tempo and pace.

Which means.

Never allow your opponent to dictate the tempo on your service games.

2) Start your motion on your own terms.

Never start serving until you have mentally recovered from the last point.

If you feel any carryover effect.

Step away from the baseline and breathe deeply for 3 times and start your pre-serve routine again.

This will help you set and maintain a good rhythm for your service games.

3) Never rush through your motion.

This is a very important point when serving.

You should never feel like you are rushing before or during your service motion.

Your body needs to be relaxed and your mind should be picturing one fluid service motion.

Again, if you are feeling nervous at any time before you start your service motion.

Step away from the line and repeat the above suggestions I just gave YOU.

Then start your pre-service routine over again.

At the junior level.